Mark Barwald

Copywriter at Ogilvy
8bitfuture:

New wireless devices communicate without batteries.
University of Washington Engineers have developed wireless transmitters and receivers which are able to communicate over short distances without an in-built energy source.
Instead of a battery, the devices use a technique known as ‘ambient backscatter’, where they detect, harness, and reflect TV signals to create a sort of “morse code” which can transmit small amounts of data between the devices.
During testing the devices were used in a variety of indoor and outdoor locations around Seattle, and successfully communicated with each other at distances of up to 2.5 feet at 1 kilobit per second. That’s enough to send information such as a sensor readings, text messages and contact information.
Potential uses for the devices include allowing wearable devices such as smartwatches to send text messages or emails without power, or as a secondary method of communication when their batteries run out. It could also allow battery-free wireless sensor networks, for example, sensors placed in a bridge could monitor the health of the concrete and steel, then send an alert if one of the sensors picks up a hairline crack.

8bitfuture:

New wireless devices communicate without batteries.

University of Washington Engineers have developed wireless transmitters and receivers which are able to communicate over short distances without an in-built energy source.

Instead of a battery, the devices use a technique known as ‘ambient backscatter’, where they detect, harness, and reflect TV signals to create a sort of “morse code” which can transmit small amounts of data between the devices.

During testing the devices were used in a variety of indoor and outdoor locations around Seattle, and successfully communicated with each other at distances of up to 2.5 feet at 1 kilobit per second. That’s enough to send information such as a sensor readings, text messages and contact information.

Potential uses for the devices include allowing wearable devices such as smartwatches to send text messages or emails without power, or as a secondary method of communication when their batteries run out. It could also allow battery-free wireless sensor networks, for example, sensors placed in a bridge could monitor the health of the concrete and steel, then send an alert if one of the sensors picks up a hairline crack.

(Source: washington.edu, via futurescope)

The competition has been aggressive during this period of uncertainty, but we are, as we have always been, determined to prove to you why Dell is the best solutions provider to meet your needs.

Michael Dell, in an open letter to Dell’s “customers and partners” about his ongoing efforts to take the struggling company private. 

Just how bad is the PC industry right now? Focus on the “solutions provider” part. IBM doesn’t get nearly enough credit for being way ahead on this move.

(via parislemon)

new-aesthetic:
hautepop:
One step down the catwalk for Google Glass; a giant leap for branding?
A couple of months ago, I claimed that Google Glass was irrelevant to fashion:
Ten years down the line when there are 500 different styles of face-mounted display screen and its varied forms aren’t trying to claim any relationship to function – *then* Google Glass may have a chance to be something about fashion. Or when the technology’s reverse-mounted into vintage sunglass frames. Or maybe fashion is parasitic on other sets of referents: maybe Google Glass will only be able to be fashion when to wear a pair is to be making a visual reference to sci-fi movies of the 1980s, or Taiwanese street style blogs, or a glimmer of a 2014 revival in the pre-fall collections of 2023 — that is, when wearing a pair of Google Glasses ceases to be mostly about “Oh my god I’m wearing a pair of Google Glasses”.
But fashion is a fickle (and fast-moving) mistress, and yesterday Diane von Furstenberg sent models down the catwalk at New York Fashion Week wearing… Google Glasses.
[…]
(via Dan W)

new-aesthetic:

hautepop:

One step down the catwalk for Google Glass; a giant leap for branding?

A couple of months ago, I claimed that Google Glass was irrelevant to fashion:

Ten years down the line when there are 500 different styles of face-mounted display screen and its varied forms aren’t trying to claim any relationship to function – *then* Google Glass may have a chance to be something about fashion. Or when the technology’s reverse-mounted into vintage sunglass frames. Or maybe fashion is parasitic on other sets of referents: maybe Google Glass will only be able to be fashion when to wear a pair is to be making a visual reference to sci-fi movies of the 1980s, or Taiwanese street style blogs, or a glimmer of a 2014 revival in the pre-fall collections of 2023 — that is, when wearing a pair of Google Glasses ceases to be mostly about “Oh my god I’m wearing a pair of Google Glasses”.

But fashion is a fickle (and fast-moving) mistress, and yesterday Diane von Furstenberg sent models down the catwalk at New York Fashion Week wearing… Google Glasses.

[…]

(via Dan W)

brit:
We’re pretty sure we live in the future. Belkin’s WeMo lets you control your outlets with an app. 

brit:

We’re pretty sure we live in the future. Belkin’s WeMo lets you control your outlets with an app. 

(via thenextweb)

Charleston’s police department is partnering with software giant IBM on a pilot project to better identify trends in armed robberies. By plugging in a variety of data, including variables such as the season, time of day and even the weather, officials hope to speed up results and uncover weak spots through what the industry calls “predictive analytics.”

Charleston Police Department using more computer trending to see crime patterns | The Post and Courier (via smarterplanet)

(via emergentfutures)

stoweboyd:

The JuiceTank is the first iPhone case to feature an integrated wall charger that folds flat to provide maximum portability. The automated plug deploys easily and allows you to plug your phone directly into any outlet. No cords required.

See kickstarter project.

This is a trend: mobile devices will have everything they need to operate independently. Their own plugs, but also being able to download music without a PC, to upload pictures without a PC, and so on. And soon, wireless electricity. Untethered mobility.

(via thenextweb)

npr:

This is where I’ll be when the zombies come. — Tanya
(via Safe House Transforms Into Impenetrable Concrete Box | Gadget Lab | Wired.com)

npr:

This is where I’ll be when the zombies come. — Tanya

(via Safe House Transforms Into Impenetrable Concrete Box | Gadget Lab | Wired.com)

photojojo:

New in the Photojojo Shop: The iPhone Shutter Remote

This small remote lets you shoot photo and video from 30 feet away!

It comes with a stand, too, so you can shoot self-portraits, time-lapses, long-exposures, and more.

(via thenextweb)